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Date PostedJanuary 24, 2019

Put Safety First in Construction This Year

The new year is well underway and sadly there has already been a number of deaths on Australian worksites and many more injured. But it’s not too late to start making safety the top priority and avoiding further injuries and fatalities, as well as cost to the business.  By improving workplace health and safety, employers are not only protecting the well-being of their employees and contractors, complying with federal and state requirements but also promoting productivity.

The first step in managing a site’s health and safety is identifying the hazards. It is an employer’s duty to ensure hazards (anything that may potentially cause harm), is identified.

The next step is to assess the risks and determine the nature of the hazard and how serious the consequences may be. Employers should also determine the likelihood of the hazard actually happening.

Once risks are identified and assessed, risks need to be controlled. If hazards cannot be eliminated, the risks associated with them must be minimised. The most effective control measures are reasonably practicable in the circumstances presented on the site.

Another step in the process involved reviewing control measures regularly to ensure their continued effectiveness and that they are going as planned, if not they need to be replaced.

For more information go to https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/risk

But it isn’t just up to the employer to ensure health and safety, workers also have a duty of care to ensure they work in a way that doesn’t present a hazard to  themselves or others.

In order to do this workers must be properly trained and if they are engaging in high risk work, they must be certified.

Construction Safety Training

Anyone involved in construction work in Australia is required to complete construction induction training also known as The White Card course.

Not only does everyone have to complete the training, but everyone on site must have proof of having completed the training in the form of the white card- a small credit card sized accreditation that confirms you have completed construction induction training.

The course is most conveniently accessed and completed online and as a leading Registered Training Organisation, we can make the process as smooth and simple for you as possible, no matter where in Australia you live or plan to work. All that’s needed for you to complete the course online is access to a computer, internet connection and printer.

The benefit of the online course is the convenience, being able to complete the training for anywhere, 24/7. It also costs less than old fashioned face-to-face training.Most of our students complete the course in an average of 5 hours in one sitting, however you can choose to do the entire course at once or spread it out over a longer period of time.

The White Card will be sent to you via Australia Post once all the requirements are met and you are free to start working on a construction site. The accreditation gained is also nationally recognised, so you wont have to repeat the training if you move to another state or plan to work cross borders.

In addition to the White Card course, employers must also ensure workers have completed the necessary site specific and task specific training. Even if you’ve working in construction for a while, you may want to brush up on your safety knowledge.

Workers have a responsibility to ensure they abide by the requirements of their site’s health and safety plan and everyone needs to work together to ensure a safe and secure work site.

 

Peter Cutforth is a Director at Urban E-Learning, a global elearning and web strategy firm based in George St Brisbane. Peter's interests extend to training, safety and compliance, online marketing, and Mobile Apps.

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